Fostering Global Change

As days of social distancing turn into weeks, and perhaps months, we wonder will life ever return to normal. What is normal? For the first time in years we have an opportunity to step off the global thread mill of capitalism, consumerism and competition. One of the first things resulting from the announcement of lock downs, was lines at check-outs, competing for essential items. This had an adverse effect on vulnerable members of our community when they found entire shelves emptied as a result of panic buying.

Our conditioned minds are consistent with a global economy that elevates capitalism and disregards poverty and the sick. Our current global crisis is symptomatic of a post war attitude of accumulating assets and wealth. This is not a judgement but merely a wake-up call. It is a time to take a long hard look at ourselves, our society and our attitude toward our environment. If reports are to be believed, this coronavirus may be with us in some form or other for several months, even years. As a global society we need to adapt our mental attitudes towards our health, our aspirations and our fellow humans. Justifiably, everyone is hailing health professionals and key workers as true heroes. Just as in a time of war, we praise front-line soldiers, and in times of civil unrest we praise our police force and fire service. But how soon will their efforts be forgotten? When we realise there isn’t an imminent threat to our health? As soon as the danger passes, we return to our normal behaviour patterns conditioned by the ego. Ego patterns follow the national and global trend. When the economy is buoyant and food is plentiful, we feel comfortable and perhaps complacent about our situation. Alternatively, when fear arises in the world due to a pandemic and its catastrophic effects on the economy and the health system, we follow that trend, becoming hyper vigilant and remaining shut off from our community.

There is a pattern emerging here. We are micro-chips supporting a global stream of thought. Individually, we need to take responsibility for our contribution to the current world order. Our ego will try to deny its contribution to a failing world system. It is our inner reality that decides how we experience the world. The more entrenched we are in ego and its conditioned adoration of consumerism, the more we are a slave to competition and market trends. As that commercial world crumbles under the inevitable economic fallout, we will suffer with it because that is where our ego’s allegiance lies. However, if we align with the inner truth at the core of our being, we will emerge as a new world consciousness. Stable, connected and united.

We may for a time withstand the waves of world uncertainty that wash over us, but eventually as the shore recedes further and further, we must trust our ability to float to the surface, buoyed by the current of absolute reality.

Collette O’Mahony

01/0/2020

Nature’s Cure

One thing that will come out of global self-isolation is a deeper appreciation of our natural surroundings. As soon as lock downs were announced around the world people flocked to national parks and green spaces, many for the first time in several weeks, even months.

In the rising age of technology we are spending more and more time on our phones and laptops. Our entertainment comes from streaming programs and movies. Essentially, we live in a Wi-Fi world. Nature is something remote, removed from our daily experience. Perhaps the current crisis will lead us to find more balance between insular online activity and outdoor exercise. There is nothing like something being prohibited to cause a longing for it. Driving through open spaces, no matter how scenic, is still a step removed from the immersive experience that comes from walking, jogging and cycling, among other outdoor pursuits, while filling our lungs with clean air.

Maybe we are nature’s virus and it has sent us to our rooms, flats and houses to wallow in the comfort we so desire, while it recovers and regenerates. Everything in the universe is replication; the micro reflects the macro. The micro organism (covid-19) that is attacking human airways is a replication of the human attacking the atmosphere. While scientists work tirelessly to find a cure for the virus, the earth has found a cure – confining humanity within four walls until we learn to appreciate our natural environment and treat it with utmost respect.

When we finally emerge from our cocoons, I hope we have a deeper appreciation of the natural world and our responsibility to give it equal respect as if it were our own body.

Collette O’Mahony

28/03/2020

Cairngorms National Park, Scotland.

Finding inner calm in a time of crisis.

What can get us through this time of fear and isolation?

It is true that worry never amounted to a solution, and fear never nourished a single heart. There is a lesson to be learned in our current situation as we wall ourselves off in our homes for fear of catching the virus, or to save others as we wait for our immune system to fight off an infection.

How can we access our eternal being when the mind is crowded by fearful thoughts as ego struggles to make sense of its crumbling world?

It is important to remain informed of new developments in our nation and globally but avoid being saturated by it. Take in the essential information and leave the rest. The ego thrives on fear just as the virus thrives on human contact. Ego and self are comparable terms in spiritual texts. Self isolation (ego isolation) can lead us to a deeper understanding of our eternal being if we take the time to tune into our ever present, underlying peace. This inner peace is generally obscured by mental noise caused by anxiety and stress, never more so than in the current financial and global uncertainty. Yet, when you can take a few moments to check in with your feeling body and allow emotions to pass like waves across deeper still waters, a space opens up where everything is calm. Sure, the waves of uncertainty continue to crash upon the surface but this is not who you are, it is merely a current created by the fearful ego.

We all play a part in the unfolding universe. Mental well being is crucial to our experience in an ever changing world. Clinging to foundations built in sand leads to drowning. Our seemingly solid world, our expectations, hopes and dreams all seem to crash against these fragile foundations creating more fear and anxiety. If your house was about to be flooded, you would evacuate. The ego is the house with shaky foundations, we are being asked to evacuate, to move to safer ground. Thankfully, this safe place is not outside of us, it is within. Go deeper into your inner space, let that safe place envelop you and reassure you that all is well. Flow with the universe, let it lead you to safety, trusting that everything is unfolding perfectly.

Collette O’Mahony

26/03/2020

In Quest Of Love by C.O’Mahony

The source of love is where confusion and misunderstanding arises. Looking for love outside of ourselves is the cause of much pain and suffering in the world. Tapping into the source of love within sets you free of the continual cycle of looking for love and clinging to a partner in the hope of fulfilment. Until you resolve your relationship with yourself, you can never be fully in a relationship with another. It is by putting your true self at the centre of your world that you can give up the need to be rescued and achieve full responsibility for your life. When you allow love to be at your centre, it flourishes in you. When love flourishes in you, it flourishes around you.

Love is expressed in relating, but the source of love is not the relationship. The source of love is within. Love grows in deep solitude, in the bliss of simply being.

‘In Quest of Love’ is a powerful pointer in the direction of emotional maturity and fulfilment. It shows the reader how to positively change their life by resetting outdated beliefs held in the subconscious mind.

‘In Quest of Love’ is a manual to make the most out of life, regardless of age, current relationships, status or any other labels that restrict growth and development.

To purchase paperback click on book image.

Beyond The Two Doors

I have been inactive on my site for over six months, the reason being I have been working on a new book. I’m delighted to report that I have recently completed the first draft of the manuscript (next comes the nuts and bolts of editing).

The subject matter covers three separate timelines, fourth century BC, mid twentieth century and current timeline of the twenty-first century. A research PhD student in search of the origins of the British and Irish Celts, comes across some photographic evidence in the archives of Cheltenham Library which leads her on an quest to discover her people’s ancient roots, and in the process discover her spiritual ancestry. The places and characters come alive as she uncovers more information about the enigmatic explorer who went in search of these ancient tribes, and the trail he left for her to find. She has visions of the ancient tribes who travelled the length of the European Steppes during a time of severe climate change, to set up home in the British Isles introducing new farming methods and spiritual practices. The landscape is dotted with ancient sites, standing stones and tombs left as a proud declaration of this ancient heritage.

Throughout the story there is a voice, a voice that speaks from beyond the two doors, before time and space and separation from the totality of the universe. It is the voice that calls us Home.

Living in the Himalayas

For the past three and a half years I have lived in a small Indian town in the Himalayas. The Tibetan name for here is ‘Tso Pema’ or Lotus Lake. It has very special significance for the Tibetan People because of Guru Padmasambhava, or second Buddha. He brought Buddhism to Tibet in the 9th century. I was fortunate to be here in 2016 when His Holiness the Dalai Lama XIV came for the Tsechu festival to commemorate the birthday of Guru Padmasambhava (Tibetan year of the Monkey).

The plight of the Tibetan exiles and Nepali people living in the Himalayas came to my attention when I began volunteering as an English teacher in a local monastery. Many of the boys are orphaned, or come from extreme poverty. Basic needs such as food, shelter and clothing are not available to the families of these young boys and so they are sent to monasteries, if they’re lucky. Many end up in appalling situations. Several situations have been brought to my attention over the last few years. I have helped and done what I can but this never seems to be enough. In one case, a 9 year old boy needed life saving surgery costing £4,000 ($5,250). This procedure was only available through private consultation. The consultant visited the nearest city, Calcutta (a seven hour journey for the family) once a month. The family sold all their possessions and the small plot of land they used to grow vegetables to raise money for the operation, but only managed to secure 10,000 rupees (£1,000). They were devastated that they would lose their beautiful boy. When my friend and I heard about the situation, we were so shocked that we immediately emailed our friends asking for a donation to raise the money for the boy’s operation. The consultant’s visit was due in 12 days time, and so time was of the essence. The response from my friends was overwhelming. It is something that will remain with me for the rest of my life. Not only did we raise the money for the operation, but enough money for his medication (which is separate cost in India), and also enough to accommodate his parents during his hospital stay. I am delighted to report that Dawa is now a fit and healthy 12 year old boy.

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My young students.

IMG-20180914-WA0000Just two days ago I was shown photos of a seventy-five year old man living in appalling conditions near Darjeeling. He needed, what we would consider a small sum, (£100) to fix his roof and make it wind and water proof for the freezing winter conditions, and also to provide a store of food for winter. These are basic human needs which everyone should have.

Because of visa reasons, I am leaving India at the end of September. However, I want to continue supporting the marginalized communities living in the Himalaya, particularly the Nepali and Tibetans who have no status in India. My friend and I, along with trusted friends here in Tso Pema are setting up a tour and travel agency called Pure Himalaya to help fund better living conditions for the beautiful people of the Himalayas. I will post updates here, on Instagram and facebook.

Thank you for reading this and being part of my journey. Perhaps one day you will join us on a Pure Himalaya tour and experience for yourself the majesty and serenity of the Himalaya.

Collette xx

Pure Himalaya Tours

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